Blade and Bow 22-Year-Old Bourbon Review & Tasting Notes

Blade and Bow 22-Year-Old Kentucky Straight Bourbon Review

In Bourbon Whiskey Reviews by Steve CoomesLeave a Comment

Blade and Bow 22-Year-Old Bourbon Bottle Photo
“We are honored to call the Stitzel-Weller Distillery home to Blade and Bow bourbons, and to play a part in preserving the careful craftsmanship and unique artistry that was established and perfected within these walls."
Meghan Redler, brand manager, Blade and Bow

JIM'S DESERT ISLAND WHISKEYS

Blade and Bow 22-Year-Old Kentucky Straight Bourbon

BOTTLE DETAILS

  • DISTILLER: Blade and Bow

  • MASH BILL: Undisclosed

  • AGE: 22 years

  • YEAR: 2020

  • PROOF: 92 Proof (46% ABV)

  • MSRP: None suggested by Diageo, though online retailers’ prices are $1,100-$1,400

  • BUY ONLINE: Wine-Searcher.com

NOSE: Caramel  |  Corn  |  Spiced Cherries  |  Toasted Oak

TASTE: Rye Spice  |  Oak  |  Faint Sweet Honey  |  Green Apple

FINISH: Medium with lingering sweetness and some grain

SHARE WITH: While young, this is a blend to share with your “drink curious” not too judgy friends.

WORTH THE PRICE: I found Ingram an interesting expression. I am generally a Midwest Grain Products fan, and I like to support craft distillers/blenders with innovative ideas. With all that being said, at over $70 for a less than 4-year-old, sourced, blended whiskey, this would be a tough sell for me.

BOTTLE, BAR OR BUST: This whiskey is not a bust. It has interest and depth that you wouldn’t expect by its age. The blending is done well and with the innovative take on aging, I will give it a BAR rating. Try it first, if you can, before you buy. In the fifty dollar range, I would be tempted to go bottle.

OVERALL: O. H. Ingram River Aged Straight Whiskey, I found interesting whiskey. Aged in a floating “rickhouse” at the confluence of the Ohio and Mississippi Rivers, in Ballard County, Kentucky. The theory being the gentle rocking of the barrels enhances the aging process. This process has its roots in the river transport of barreled distillate from Bourbon County delivered to New Orleans, with the transformed taste that apocryphally led to our native spirit. Does it make a difference? I have no idea, but there are a lot of people putting barrels on ocean voyages, riverboats, playing music to them, and even aging in cranberry bogs.

I have an issue with brands using invented or unrelated stories to support the “marketing” of their spirits. I don’t see that as an issue with O.H. Ingram. They have family history tied to the river and actually age on floating barges. They don’t hide the source, age, or mash bills of their product. Starting from typically quality rye and bourbon distillate from MGP in Indiana, aging for over three years and blended well, has produced a straight whiskey. It has a surprising depth for a young age. I found it drinkable neat, better with ice, but not particularly suitable for cocktails. My only issue with this product is the price, which is high for what it is. Understanding that the cost of sourcing and barreling probably drives this cost. If you find it in a bar, or you have the resource and drinking curiosity, I would not dissuade you from giving this one a try.

NOSE: Cough Syrup | Dark Cherry | Blackberries | Spiced Gumdrops | Lemon rind

TASTE: Bitter Chocolate | Beefy | Cola | Astringent | Oak

FINISH: Dry, short and astringent

SHARE WITH: Fans of ultra-aged, tannic bourbons.

WORTH THE PRICE: Not for me.

BOTTLE, BAR OR BUST: Bar.

OVERALL: Despite the inviting nose—which revealed layer after incredible layer of aromas the longer it rested—whiskey is for drinking, and that effort ended the fun for me.

I get that others like some of these extra-long-aged bourbons; in fact, I appreciate it. That crowd is wired differently from me and variety is a great thing. But unlike Michter’s, which somehow pulls off the feat of bottling 20- and 25-year bourbon and rye that is not as drying, it doesn’t win me over. This 22-year dries up quickly and heads right to astringency for me. Your reactions may vary, and I hope they do, especially if you spend the exorbitant sums requested online.

With Stitzel-Weller releasing a whiskey this woody to celebrate its 85th anniversary, I’m not looking forward to what remains in its already aged stocks. But if you’re a fan of geezer liquids, they might be worth the wait.


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Blade and Bow 22-Year-Old Kentucky Straight Bourbon Whiskey Returns with Limited Re-Release to Commemorate the Stitzel-Weller Distillery's 85th Anniversary

LOUISVILLE, Ky.—In celebration of the historic opening of the Stitzel-Weller Distillery 85 years ago, Blade and Bow has re-released its rare and limited 22-Year-Old Kentucky Straight Bourbon. An ode to the distinctive distillers who set the standard for crafting exceptional bourbon, this award-winning whiskey is the latest release from the famed distillery and will be available in 12 states as well as at Stitzel-Weller itself.

“We are honored to call the Stitzel-Weller Distillery home to Blade and Bow bourbons, and to play a part in preserving the careful craftsmanship and unique artistry that was established and perfected within these walls,” said Meghan Redler, brand manager for Blade and Bow. “Releasing Blade and Bow 22-Year-Old this year during Bourbon Heritage Month allows us to pay homage to this historic distillery with our finest liquid.”


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This coveted re-release is available just in time for this celebratory month, which was originally created to emphasize the significance of bourbon being America's “Native Spirit.” The month-long celebration aims to highlight the heritage, craftsmanship, tradition and achievements that the bourbon industry has contributed to the United States. As the most recently aged and bottled bourbon at the Stitzel-Weller Distillery, which includes some of the last bourbon produced there before it closed in 1992, and inspired by the passion of its original creators, Blade and Bow's 22-Year-Old Kentucky Straight Bourbon makes for the perfect bottle to commemorate the occasion.

Embodying the one-of-a-kind artistry that has been produced by Stitzel-Weller's rich traditions, the rarity of Blade and Bow's 22-Year-Old has created a cult-like following, drawing in consumers who are looking to taste a bit of the past. Blade and Bow 22-Year-Old Kentucky Straight Bourbon Whiskey will be available in limited quantities beginning in September in California, Texas, Georgia, Colorado, New York, South Carolina, Illinois, Kentucky, Washington, D.C., Tennessee, North Carolina and Virginia.


Disclaimer: Blade and Bow provided Bourbon & Banter with a sample of their product for this review. We appreciate their willingness to allow us to review their products with no strings attached. Thank you.


ABOUT THE AUTHOR
Sr. Contributor | | Website

Steve Coomes is a Louisville restaurant industry veteran turned award-winning food writer. In his 29-year career, he has edited and written for dozens of national trade and consumer publications including Pizza Today, Nation's Restaurant News and Southern Living. As a spirits writer, Steve's byline can be found in Whisky magazine, Bourbon Review, Bourbon & Banter, WhiskeyWash.com and other publications. In 2014, he authored the book, "Country Ham: A Southern Tradition of Hogs, Salt & Smoke," and has authored other titles as a private ghostwriter.
Read Steve's full profile.

About the Author

Steve Coomes

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Steve Coomes is a Louisville restaurant industry veteran turned award-winning food writer. In his 29-year career, he has edited and written for dozens of national trade and consumer publications including Pizza Today, Nation's Restaurant News and Southern Living. As a spirits writer, Steve's byline can be found in Whisky magazine, Bourbon Review, Bourbon & Banter, WhiskeyWash.com and other publications. In 2014, he authored the book, "Country Ham: A Southern Tradition of Hogs, Salt & Smoke," and has authored other titles as a private ghostwriter. Read Steve's full profile.