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Lux Row Distillers Re-Launches Daviess County Kentucky Straight Bourbon

In Bourbon News by Patrick "Pops" GarrettLeave a Comment

To pay homage to the rich distilling tradition of Daviess County, Kentucky, Lux Row Distillers is re-launching Daviess County Kentucky Straight Bourbon – an ultra-premium family of bourbons, with three variants.

This unique bourbon launches this week and consists of a mixed mash bill of both wheated and ryed bourbons for a balanced sweetness and spice. The three variants in this line are Daviess County Kentucky Straight Bourbon, Daviess County Kentucky Straight Bourbon – Cabernet Sauvignon Finish and Daviess County Kentucky Straight Bourbon – French Oak Finish.

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Revisiting Distillery 291: Bad Guy and HR Whiskey Reviews

In Bourbon Whiskey Reviews, Rye Whiskey Reviews by Brett Atlas4 Comments

Back in 2017 I covered the amazing journey of Michael Myers from east coast photographer to Rocky Mountains distiller. At the time, Distillery 291 was winning medals and garnering praise from a couple influential whiskey figures, but was still an off-the-radar craft distiller in a crowded and trendy field. Over the years, 291 has continued to grow and establish itself as a major Colorado whiskey brand.

Perhaps the clarity of vision Myers always held for Distillery 291 should come as no surprise from the former New York photographer. He wouldn’t hear of sourcing from someone else. They would create unique Colorado whiskeys that would be authentic from the beginning. Even when I tried the Colorado Rye Whiskey that was just over a year old, I couldn’t believe how good it was.

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McKenzie Straight Rye Whiskey Review

In Rye Whiskey Reviews by Jeffrey Schwartz3 Comments

McKenzie Straight Rye is a unique pour. Distilled from a mash of 80% Rye and 20% Malted Barley, it is aged three years and non-chill-filtered. Finger Lakes Distilling chose to age the rye in quarter casks. Smaller barrels provide more surface area per volume of whiskey to the wood, which gives it a faster maturation cycle than a standard 53-gallon barrel. The whiskey doesn’t age faster, but it acquires qualities of longer-aged whiskeys.