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Chicken with Bourbon Mustard Sauce

In Food by Chrissy MartinLeave a Comment

Love is in the air and I don’t just mean our love of bourbon, I’m talking about Valentine’s day. So, what are your plans for the big day? What’s the best gift you can give your whisky loving Valentine? I mean, I think the obvious answer here is bourbon. Do you plan to give your sweetheart their favorite bottle (maybe even two or three)? For me, I would take a bottle of bourbon over roses any day!


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Inaugural New Orleans Bourbon Festival

In Events by Jeffrey SchwartzLeave a Comment

If you’re scratching your head wondering why you’ve never heard of the New Orleans Bourbon Festival before, don’t worry, you’re not alone because 2017 is the inaugural year. If you’re wondering how good it could be for its initial year, again, don’t worry, it is going to be fantastic. By the time it is over, I believe you’ll be convinced this is a long-established event. So, block off Friday, March 24th through Sunday, March 26th on your calendar now, because you don’t want to miss this.


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Smooth Amber Wheated Bourbon Review

In Bourbon Whiskey Reviews by Brett AtlasLeave a Comment

Like many new craft distilleries, West Virginia’s Smooth Ambler Spirits began sourcing whiskey while developing its production facilities. They have been wildly successful in building a cult-like following for their Old Scout label (SAOS), largely on their ability to select excellent barrels of higher-proof bourbons and ryes. The surge in demand claimed the incredible ryes as its first victim in 2015. Like Willett Family Estate Bourbon, you can now only buy limited edition releases of SAOS ryes periodically at their gift shop. A bottle of any SAOS Rye is snapped up immediately for a high multiple on the secondary market.


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Old Ripy Bourbon Review

In Bourbon Whiskey Reviews by Patrick "Pops" GarrettLeave a Comment

Old Ripy is a combination of 8-year-old Kentucky Straight Bourbon with 12-year-old and younger whiskies for added complexity and oak. It is distilled at the Wild Turkey Distillery in Anderson County, aged in timber warehouses and non-chill filtered to retain congeners, fusil oils, lipid fats and proteins we believe you would find in the original. This results in more natural and complex flavor characteristics, fuller body, and a smooth but “chewier” mouthfeel.


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Bond & Lillard Bourbon Review

In Bourbon Whiskey Reviews by Patrick "Pops" GarrettLeave a Comment

Distilled and bottled and at the Wild Turkey distillery in Lawrenceburg, KY, this Kentucky Straight Bourbon Whiskey is aged a minimum of seven years in timber warehouses and is charcoal filtered. This filtration process simulates the aeration process that happens in the barrel, converting more aggressive congeners to esters that end in more elegant top notes. The result is a lighter colored and flavored bourbon with more floral notes.


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The Magic of C+S (Caring + Sharing)

In Banter by Brett AtlasLeave a Comment

I’ve written about the bourbon secondary market before, but there is a unique subsection that gets little attention and is widely unknown. They are known as C+S groups (“cost-plus-ship”), and their members agree to trade with each other at retail (or below) pricing only. These groups were formed with the core principle of sharing whiskey with each other and foregoing the ludicrous profits being made elsewhere by those flipping bottles.


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Thanksgiving Bourbon Hunt

In Banter by Matt SelfLeave a Comment

Just about every year on Thanksgiving after the family gatherings had all but died down, the football is about over, and the kids are fast asleep, I load up in a pick-up truck with my bourbon hunting brother to camp out in front of Midtown Corkdorks in Nashville for a shot at an allocated bottle of whiskey. I’m one of those guys. Crazy enough to brave the elements to pick up something that is worth way less than the time and energy spent acquiring it. Before I had developed relationships in the retail world, this was one of my best shots at getting a top shelf bottle. My first bottle of Eagle Rare 17 came from showing up in time to be #4 in the queue. I managed a bottle of NAS Black Maple Hill several years ago for a cool $40. If only I had known people would pay $400 today for it, I wouldn’t have drunk half that bottle over the past several years.