Distillery 291 Colorado Whiskey Header

Distillery 291 Colorado Whiskey Review

In American Whiskey Reviews by Brett AtlasLeave a Comment


A traditional whiskey made from rye malt sour mash aged in American White Oak deep char barrel and finished with toasted Aspen Staves. Sweet on the front and spicy in the middle with a sweet finsh. You can hear the saloon doors swing with this one.Distillery 291
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Distillery 291 Colorado Whiskey


  • DISTILLER: Distillery 291
  • MASH BILL: Undisclosed (but just over 50% rye)
  • AGE: NAS (but just over a year)
  • YEAR: 2016
  • PROOF: 101.7 (Basecamp Wine & Spirits Barrel Select)
  • MSRP: $70.00



Distillery 291 Colorado Whiskey Background Info

Back in April, I brought you the incredible story of Michael Myers and Colorado Springs’ Distillery 291. The title Craft Distiller” is carelessly thrown at most of the 1300+ small distillers operating in the US, but Distillery 291 is one of the few companies displaying true craftsmanship and innovation.

Based on the rye mash bill of Myers’ favorite whiskey, the Thomas H. Handy Sazerac Rye, the Colorado Whiskey is aged in 10-gallon charred oak barrels for about a year. “But 10-gallon barrels and year-old whiskey is cheating,” you say? The World Whiskies Awards, the San Francisco World Spirits Competition and Jim Murray (of Jim Murray’s Whiskey Bible) strongly disagree. In fact, after tasting Distillery 291’s whiskey, Murray has declared “that whiskey just a year old can be this good is obscene.”

Unlike some new distillers, 291 actually produces great whiskey, and they love it so much, they bottle and sell their white dog. But a Colorado distillery should make a western whiskey, so Myers began inserting toasted Aspen tree staves into the barrel for 2-3 weeks before bottling. “My whiskey doesn’t taste like any other whiskey out there,” Myers proudly exclaims.


About the Author
Brett Atlas

Brett Atlas

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Mark Twain said, “too much of anything is bad, but too much good whiskey is barely enough.” A passionate whiskey hunter & gatherer, Brett serves his opinions and reviews just like his bourbon - straight and not watered down. A native Chicagoan, he attended the University of Kansas and Chicago’s John Marshall Law School before moving to Omaha, Nebraska, where he runs a packaging distribution company and enjoys opening bottles with good friends. Read Brett's full profile.

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